Facial Reflexology – Health Benefits And Facial Skin Rejuvenation

Reflexology is more commonly associated with the feet and hands but the same results can be achieved through facial reflexology. Some people just don’t like their hands and in particular their feet being touched and if you are one of them, facial reflexology may be the perfect way of enjoying this relaxing, calming and invigorating treatment.

Health Benefits And Skin Rejuvenation

In our last blog, Calm Therapy examined the vagus nerve and how stimulation can improve certain conditions including headaches, migraines, anxiety and poor blood circulation and this article expands on this explaining how this nerve can be stimulated by facial reflexology and it also looks at the benefits in regard to health issues and facial skin rejuvenation.

What Is Facial Reflexology?

The face maps the whole of the body with different facial zones connecting to the various vital organs including the heart, liver, kidneys, lungs, colon, bladder and stomach. In this type of therapy, the focus is on the pressure points located on the face, which are stimulated by fingers and hands to restore energy and balance. The face is very close to the brain and cranial nerves making this type of reflexology extremely powerful.

Facial Benefits

  • Improved facial tone and texture
  • Tightening of the skin
  • Reduces fine lines and wrinkles
  • Firms facial muscles
  • Reduces puffiness
  • Promotes a glowing and radiant complexion
  • Tightens drooping jowls and sagging eyelids

Facial reflexology is rejuvenating for the skin in terms of its tone and texture. It can bring a really healthy glow to your complexion making you look much healthier and younger. Circulation is improved and muscle tension is reduced which results in the face looking smoother which is accompanied by a sense of wellbeing as it relieves tension, not only in the face but in the neck, scalp, brain and shoulders. Many people describe it as a mini facelift.

Facial Reflexology Can Help With The Following Health Issues 

  • Stress and anxiety levels
  • Insomnia
  • Depression
  • Digestive disorders
  • Infertility
  • Allergies and sinusitis/congestion
  • Menopause and hormonal issues
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Asthma
  • Muscular aches and pains

It can lower stress and anxiety levels as well as accelerating and improving injury healing. It also promotes better sleep patterns and relieves mental strain and improves concentration.

Facial Reflexology And the Vagus Nerve

The vagus nerve can be stimulated by facial reflexology by massage along the carotid sinus, which can be found along the carotid arteries on both sides of the neck. Massage techniques include effleurage, which are stroking movements before the deeper tissue work using petrissage on the shoulders.

What To Do Next

Jane Long from Calm Therapy trained with Ziggie Bergman and now practises the Bergman Method of Facial Reflexology from her studio in Eastbourne in East Sussex. If you would like to try this relaxing therapy or would like more information, call Jane on 07734 695964 for a without obligation chat.

Stimulating The Vagus Nerve With Reflexology

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The vagus nerve is a nerve that many people don’t realise they have and if you are in that scenario, you certainly are not alone. However, it is the longest nerve in the body and originates in the brain, travelling down from the neck from where it passes around the digestive system, heart, lungs, spleen, liver and pancreas. It is important that this nerve is stimulated in order to tone and strengthen it, as this will ultimately improve a person’s health and wellbeing.

In the latest blog from Calm Therapy, based in Eastbourne in East Sussex, we look at how working on the pressure points associated with the vagus nerve during reflexology may help with digestive issues, stress and anxiety and bring a sense of calm, as well as giving pain relief, although it must be stressed that reflexology is not a cure for any disorder and it cannot be used in the diagnosis of any physical issues.

What Is The Vagus Nerve?

First things first, just a little more detail about the vagus nerve. It is the body’s major parasympathetic nerve and is a bundle of motor and sensory fibres that link the brain stem to the heart, gut and lungs. Vagus is actually Latin for “wandering” and as the nerve wanders through your system, it sends out fibres from your brain stem to your organs interacting with the liver, spleen, gall bladder, ureter, female fertility organs, neck, ears, tongue and kidneys.

This certainly adds up to it being an extremely important nerve, which controls unconscious functions of the body as well as aiding food digestion, keeping the heart rate steady and supporting breathing and sweating. That’s quite impressive so far, and the list goes on to include regulating blood pressure and blood glucose balance, helping the kidneys to function as well as being important in fertility issues. It is therefore quite clear that the vagus nerve is critical for optimal health irrespective of your issues.

Vagus Nerve Stimulation Can Help With:

  • Anxiety and Stress
  • Heart conditions
  • Digestive Disorders
  • Poor blood circulation
  • Tinnitus
  • Migraines

Looking After Your Vagus Nerve With Reflexology

There are many techniques used to stimulate the vagus nerve including positive social relationships, laughing, yoga, meditation, exercise, breathing slowly and deeply, massage and reflexology. The vagus nerve is directly affected during a reflexology session, which is not surprising as there are more nerves in the feet per square inch than any other part of the body. Reflexology will help to slow the heart rate, improve digestion, lower blood pressure and promote relaxation. The feet have various vagus nerve reflexes and reflexology stimulates these areas, thus increasing the nerve’s activity. Oxytocin is released promoting relaxation, healthy digestion and also a sense of wellbeing.

Conclusion

Lack of stimulation of the vagus nerve can impact on your health and when it is not working optimally, problems such as anxiety, tinnitus, depression, weight gain, and irritable bowel syndrome may occur. Hands-on healing can help to stimulate the vagus nerve including massage, particularly reflexology.

What To Do Next

Jane from Calm Therapy belongs to the Association Of Reflexologists and the Federation Of Holistic Therapists and adheres to their strict standards to provide professional treatments. If you are interested in reflexology sessions to stimulate your vagus nerve in order to help with digestion, stress and anxiety, please call Jane on 07734 695964 for a without obligation chat. Jane is a fully qualified therapist, experienced at stimulating the vagus nerve with this safe treatment.

Image above is copyrighted by TouchPoint DK